When I’m buying a toxic gas detection instrument or system, why do I need applications engineering?

Very simply, since no two toxic gas detection applications are the same. We admit that this concept has been obscured under the quite false rubric that “All gas detection is confined entry.” Certainly, a goodly percentage of all portable gas detection instruments are designed as if they are intended for the confined entry application. These…

Detector Tubes And When To Use Them

A detector tube is a graduated glass tube filled with a chemical reagent that will produce a color change, when exposed to the gas in question. It is used with a hand pump that will draw a sample into the tube. The tubes are generally supplied in packages of ten, and are sealed at both…

Calibration Basics

Introduction It is quite unlikely that you will ever use an absolute method for gas detection. Rather, you will employ any one of dozens of “relative” [or “reference,” but not necessarily EPA Reference] methods—that is, methods that use a sensor to produce some electrical output that must be calibrated against a known standard. Then, its…

In Search of Zero

As discussed in the Calibration Basics Knowledge Base article, Interscan’s gas analyzers, and virtually all other direct-reading gas analyzers are not absolute methods. Rather, they employ “relative” [or “reference,” but not necessarily EPA Reference] methods. That is, methods that produce some output that must be calibrated against a known standard. Generally, these units must also…

Pushing The Limits Of Hydrazine Detection At NASA

Ever since Interscan developed a portable hydrazine analyzer for Brooks Air Force Base, way back in the late 1970’s, our instruments have been widely deployed in all facets of hypergol (pertaining to fluid propellant) fuel and oxidizer measurements. A new wrinkle was brought in when NASA requested an instrument with 10 parts-per-billion (ppb) sensitivity. Here…