Watch Out When Using A Zero Filter

Especially when doing low range work, it is important to make sure that your instrument is properly zeroed. Ideally, zeroing should be performed with a certified zero gas. However, mostly since it adds another step to the calibration process, this practice has somewhat fallen out of favor. The alternative to a zero gas requires that…

Are They Kidding With This Measuring Range?

One of our salespeople was demonstrating a portable hydrogen sulfide analyzer to a prospect, who told us he needed to be sure that there was “no” H2S in the ambient air—caused by a leak from a scrubber installation. Our analyzer showed a fairly consistent reading of 0.2 ppm, whereupon the prospect pulled out his nifty…

Understanding Interferences In Gas Detection

  In the field of gas detection, an “interference” is an unwanted response on your instrument, caused by some chemical other than the target analyte. Generally speaking, no analytical method—using any technology—is completely specific. Thus, it is important for instrument manufacturers to document these interferences to the best of their ability. Here at Interscan, we…

Formalin and formaldehyde

Most likely, your earliest exposure to “formaldehyde” involved some sort of biological specimen, preserved in a clear liquid. This liquid was probably identified as “formaldehyde.” And, if you were in elementary school or junior high, you didn’t give it a second thought. But, if you were to study organic chemistry, you would learn that formaldehyde…